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Saving children’s lives with data

Data and reports are unlikely tools for heroes. But the team at Texas Children’s Hospital (Houston, Texas, U.S.A.) is analyzing patient information and tracking clinical results to help improve care for vulnerable, critically ill children. A recent success story outlines some of the many ways Texas Children’s is using Allscripts EPSi™ to support clinical initiatives throughout the organization. One example of these efforts is helping infants who have difficulty swallowing. Better evaluation of babies with swallowing difficulty, to reduce risk of aspiration Children who do not swallow safely are at risk for feeding and respiratory problems. Unfortunately, the primary tool to assess swallowing disorders is invasive and its radiation may have long-term negative effects. Occupational therapists approached Senior Decision Support Analyst Mary Watson with a request to develop a way to identify infants at risk for aspiration. Using EPSi, Watson […]

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Fewer alerts, higher response rates, safer patients

  • Steven Shaha, Ph.D., DBA
  • 09/01/2015

Applications of electronic health record (EHR) technology and capabilities often do NOT consider the needs of pediatric settings. As healthcare clinicians know, pediatric patients are not just small adults. Children have unique and different needs and interventions than their adult counterparts, so that many adult-ready HIT solutions do not necessarily fit comfortably with pediatric patients or caregivers. One of our clients, a pediatric specialty hospital, had been successfully using the EHR with full computerized physician order entry (CPOE) for three years. As part of its ongoing emphasis on continuous improvements, the organization programmed and adapted the EHR to better manage dosing-related computations. Concurrently, the organization was focused on reducing alerts due to alert fatigue issues clinicians were experiencing. Would clinicians value computer-generated recommendations for dosing? The guiding imperative was simple:  Clinicians value and therefore act on owned, computer-generated recommendations for […]

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Kid-sized doses in an adult-sized world

  • Salman Naqvi, MD, MPH
  • 07/21/2015

When prescribing medications, physicians base it on the weight of the patient. Pediatricians are constantly scaling doses to fit their patients, increasing the risk of errors. To ensure patient safety, Phoenix Children’s Hospital (Phoenix, Arizona, U.S.A.) wanted to find an enhanced solution to Dose Range Checking (DRC) to help its clinicians during order entry. Phoenix Children’s Hospital Chief Medical Information Officer, Dr. Vinay Vaidya, M.D., shared more information in a recent Client Outcomes Collaboration Program webinar. The positive results were also published in an article in the Journal of Patient Safety. Phoenix Children’s had three goals for this project. First, given the importance of pediatric patient safety, it wanted to move quickly. Second, it wanted to take a phased approach, addressing high-risk, high-frequency medications first. And third, it was striving for zero prescribing errors. Unfortunately, there weren’t any commercially available, […]

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Taking the detective work out of pediatric care

  • Jennifer MacGregor
  • 03/12/2015

Alberta Children’s Hospital (Calgary, Alberta, Canada) uses Allscripts SunriseTM  to improve care and free its clinicians from tedious “detective work” and calculations. In a recent case study, physicians describe how they’ve applied intelligent order sets to pediatric diabetes management and infant Total Parenteral Nutrition (TPN). Solving the mystery of insulin management According to pediatric endocrinologist Dr. Jonathan Dawrant, managing insulin has three main challenges: 1) Even though diabetes is a growing health concern, not every clinician has enough exposure and expertise to manage insulin. 2) Insulin has no clear dose range; it’s different for every patient. This ambiguity is especially challenging for growing children. 3) To determine the appropriate dose of insulin requires input from various sources. Dawrant observed, “Doing rounds was like doing detective work…you have to gather different pieces of paper, which are located in different places, then […]