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Proof that high CPOE adoption reduces length of stay

  • Steven Shaha, Ph.D., DBA
  • 08/21/2014

Holy Spirit Hospital (Camp Hill, Penn., U.S.A.) wanted to know, “Does computerized provider order entry (CPOE) really make a difference?” There are some obvious answers about the benefits of CPOE. When clinicians and pharmacists communicate electronically, they’ll reduce costs and errors associated with transcription and paper. But Holy Spirit wanted to take it a step further: Does CPOE improve the overall measures of efficiency and quality of care? After conducting a rigorous study, the answer is a resounding yes, and is the subject of a recently published article in Applied Clinical Informatics.* How we measured the correlation between CPOE and improved clinical outcomes Length of Stay (LOS) is among the best proxy measures for overall efficiency and efficacy of care and clinical outcomes in hospitals. So we decided to study whether or not CPOE adoption correlates with LOS, which means […]

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Why an adjustable EPR is the best defense against sepsis

  • Steven Shaha, Ph.D., DBA
  • 04/22/2014

Sepsis exacts a devastating toll on human life, and the estimated costs for this disease are about US$17 billion in the United States alone.  But evidence suggests optimized electronic patient records (EPRs)* can make a real difference in the battle against sepsis and other hospital-acquired infections. My personal prediction is that, because of our ability to detect patient deterioration, sepsis will eventually become another never event. Fighting sepsis with computer power Sepsis is a deadly and costly disease that arises when the body’s response to an infection damages its own tissue. Treatments are not benign and are astronomically expensive, hence clinicians are appropriately conservative in initiating treatment. Sepsis is insidious. Clinicians know it might happen, but it’s hard to see all the factors contributing to it. In the past, we had to rely on smart clinicians, watching carefully to discern […]