It’s important when healthcare organizations buy a new electronic patient record (EPR)* to truly verify that it made a difference for clinicians, the patients they serve, and the organizations themselves. Many look at the impact of Health IT acquisitions using only financial measures, while a few remain purely focused on clinical outcomes. However most recognize the best way to measure the impact of EPR implementations should include clinical measures along with financial. The best is a balance. A lot of attention has recently been directed toward quantifying the early impacts of EPR acquisitions to ensure they were not just expenses, but genuinely good investments. An example of that perspective applies to recent implementations in the United Kingdom. Our clients there use SunriseTM by Allscripts. Examples: Length of stay and prescription turnaround times One of many statistically proven clinically and financially […]

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Proof that high CPOE adoption reduces length of stay

  • Steven Shaha, Ph.D., DBA
  • 08/21/2014

Holy Spirit Hospital (Camp Hill, Penn., U.S.A.) wanted to know, “Does computerized provider order entry (CPOE) really make a difference?” There are some obvious answers about the benefits of CPOE. When clinicians and pharmacists communicate electronically, they’ll reduce costs and errors associated with transcription and paper. But Holy Spirit wanted to take it a step further: Does CPOE improve the overall measures of efficiency and quality of care? After conducting a rigorous study, the answer is a resounding yes, and is the subject of a recently published article in Applied Clinical Informatics.* How we measured the correlation between CPOE and improved clinical outcomes Length of Stay (LOS) is among the best proxy measures for overall efficiency and efficacy of care and clinical outcomes in hospitals. So we decided to study whether or not CPOE adoption correlates with LOS, which means […]

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Why an adjustable EPR is the best defense against sepsis

  • Steven Shaha, Ph.D., DBA
  • 04/22/2014

Sepsis exacts a devastating toll on human life, and the estimated costs for this disease are about US$17 billion in the United States alone.  But evidence suggests optimized electronic patient records (EPRs)* can make a real difference in the battle against sepsis and other hospital-acquired infections. My personal prediction is that, because of our ability to detect patient deterioration, sepsis will eventually become another never event. Fighting sepsis with computer power Sepsis is a deadly and costly disease that arises when the body’s response to an infection damages its own tissue. Treatments are not benign and are astronomically expensive, hence clinicians are appropriately conservative in initiating treatment. Sepsis is insidious. Clinicians know it might happen, but it’s hard to see all the factors contributing to it. In the past, we had to rely on smart clinicians, watching carefully to discern […]

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The central nervous system’s guide to effective EHRs

When developing the Sunrise electronic health record (EHR) platform, we had a different vision than our competitors. We modeled Sunrise after one of the most intelligent networks: the central nervous system (CNS). Evaluation is at the core of Sunrise The CNS governs most processes in living organisms. It senses information, detects changes, evaluates input and takes action. Constantly monitoring, integrating and evaluating countless transactions, the CNS is the intelligent core of our being. From the earliest days of development, we envisioned Sunrise as the CNS of the healthcare organization. Our competitors started with a different approach. They designed a data repository to replace paper. Only as an afterthought did they begin to develop rules to do more than just move data electronically from place to place. In contrast, we designed (and continue to develop) Sunrise around the core concept of […]