Drug-drug interaction (DDI) alerts are supposed to help clinicians reduce risk of prescribing medications that may result in adverse drug events. The adverse events reflect medications that, when prescribed together, can cause bad events and outcomes for patients. But it is well proven that “alert fatigue” does harm, and in this case, negatively impacts any favorable intents or efficacy of avoiding DDIs. Alert fatigue, including for DDIs, happens because of the onerous number of alerts considered low-value by clinicians and information overload, causing prescribers to override or ignore alerts as often as 98% of the time. Another reason for limited impact of DDI-related alerts is that, for some specialties, the prescribing of the drug combinations tagged as DDI risks are commonplace and already proven to be good, efficacious medication approaches – cardiology among the most frequent. The medical staff at […]