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    HIT Leader Q&A: Big data offers limitless opportunities to improve care

    August 2nd, 2016

    It’s been a privilege to be named to Health Data Management’s 2016 Most Powerful Women in Healthcare IT and feature insights on this blog from some of these women leaders*. Their responses, and encouragement from my colleagues, inspired me to share my own answers to the following questions.

    Describe your current role and the path you took to get there.

    As Allscripts Analytics Chief Medical Officer, my role is to provide medical leadership to a world-class team to develop, design and deploy predictive models to improve health. My introduction to population data and analytics came during my health systems and trauma care fellowship at Johns Hopkins. Having finished my master’s degree in Public Health, I was eager to bring together my interest in improving health systems and background in surgery to improve trauma care in Kenya.

    Why did you choose Health IT as a career?

    I’ve seen how data can improve quality of care, and that has pushed me to search for efficient ways to translate gaps in care to interventions that improve the lives of patients. The shift to electronic health records (EHRs) has made large-scale healthcare data available, and advancements in technology have created information from nearly every aspect of our lives. Unfortunately, this ability to analyze health data has come with significant drawbacks to clinicians, with a resulting system that often penalizes physicians for suboptimal documentation, despite already being overstretched by inadequate face time with patients. I am driven by the opportunity to facilitate data-driven clinical improvements in care delivery without additional burden to physicians who are just trying to take care of their patients.

    Which of your career achievements are most meaningful to you?

    I was still in Kenya when, on September 21, 2013, terrorists attacked Nairobi’s Westgate Mall. In a siege that lasted several days, 67 people were killed and another 175 were injured.  As one of the medical incident commanders at the scene, I led first responders and EMTs in triage and stabilization of victims over the duration of the siege.

    In the aftermath of the tragedy, I struggled to come to terms with the lack of protocol, disparities and gaps in emergency care I had witnessed first-hand. Determined to effect change, I decided to take the account of events to the Ministry of Health, supported by hospital and pre-hospital injury surveillance data. This action resulted in an inaugural draft of a National EMS (Emergency Medical Services) Policy, operationalizing the constitutional right to emergency care for 40 million Kenyan citizens by mandating toll-free access to care (911), recognizing trained EMS providers and use of protocols in disaster and emergency response.

    By following the data that flowed from this emergency situation, we found that we were able to make a real difference on a national level. And that’s just one example of effecting change with one type of data. With big data, the opportunities to improve health care are limitless.

    What are the biggest barriers to effective population health management today?

    The biggest challenge today is normalizing data so that data from numerous sources can be used to derive value and manage population health. We need to encourage those who have data to collaborate for better outcomes, breaking down silos that exist because of reluctance around data-sharing. Through industry innovation and collaboration with national and state policy makers, findings from large-scale population health data analytics can address this issue and lead to better care.

    What are best practices that can help overcome these barriers?

    New tools can better identify and manage populations at the highest risk – filling the gaps in documentation from current EHRs, and working to improve patient engagement and responsibility for health outcomes. By simplifying analytics with actionable, point-of-care solutions embedded within the workflow, Allscripts Analytics is working to make it easier for clinicians to do the right thing. We’re helping clients identify and implement data-driven quality improvement efforts for better patient outcomes.

    How are organizations tackling population health management today compared with five years ago?

    Today, the industry is moving toward a holistic approach to integrated clinical care, made possible by informatics and interoperability among data sources, EHRs, devices and social/environmental data. There are more innovative ways to enable better patient care, for example, by helping patients to take an active role in their care through data ownership and patient responsibility.

    How do you envision population health management changing in the next five years?

    A precision medicine approach to care will revolutionize the way clinicians care for patients. Through extrapolating big data insights and predictive modeling, clinicians will be able to develop individualized patient care plans and optimize patient outcomes.

     

    * Read insights from other HIT leaders, including:

    Lessons learned from systems and Starbucks – Kate Pavlovich, Director, Strategy and Data Analytics, NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital

    ‘Endless possibilities’ spur journey from nurse to CIO and beyond – Kara Marx, Vice President Information Technology Applications, Sharp Healthcare

    The evolution of embedding excellence in health care – Carol Steltenkamp, M.D., MBA, FAAP, FHIMSS. Chair, HIMSS International Board of Directors. Chief Medical Information Officer, University of Kentucky HealthCare

    Interoperability experts weigh in on career, population health – Diane Michalec, RN, MSN, Director of Interoperability and Amy Urban, DO, MPH , Clinical Director of Interoperability at UPMC

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    HIT Leader Q&A: Interoperability experts weigh in on career, population health

    July 26th, 2016

    Recognized as an industry leader in interoperability, UPMC is a healthcare provider and insurer that operates more than 20 hospitals and 500 outpatient sites. A talented UPMC Interoperability team drives the organization’s efforts toward excellence in connectivity.

    We recently gleaned some valuable insights from two members of this team, Diane Michalec, RN, MSN, director of interoperability and Amy Urban, DO, MPH , clinical director of interoperability. They shared career advice and their perspectives on population health management:

    Tell me a little about your current role and the path you took to get there.

    Diane: I am currently the Director of Interoperability at UPMC and have responsibilities for managing the enterprise wide point of care application along with strategic planning and oversight of the interoperability program. I came into my first IT role from a critical care nurse background and have worked on several UPMC EMR systems prior to joining the interoperability team.

    Amy: I am the Clinical Director of Interoperability at UPMC as well as a Clinical Advisor at UPMC Enterprises. I joined the interoperability team in 2014 after completing my Masters in Public Health. I currently balance my IT role with that of a practicing neonatologist to keep current with the Health IT challenges facing physicians today.

    Why did you choose Health IT as a career?

    Diane: I believe the career actually chose me. I enjoyed the challenge of learning a new discipline and Health IT kept me close to the clinical side of patient care. Health IT became the perfect blend of two worlds for me and I have continued to thrive on the challenges and successes throughout my career.

    Amy: It was fate for me as well. Having a wide network of colleagues in health care, I was referred to the job opening and a wonderful match was made. It allowed me to blend my passion for delivering quality health care to a wider audience than my direct patient contacts.

    Which of your career achievements are most meaningful to you?

    Diane: Most meaningful for me is how I transitioned into Health IT. I started in IT from the ground up after spending two decades as a nurse providing direct patient care. Moving into Health IT was a big change in my career that provided a variety of new opportunities to support clinical workflow all the while having a positive impact on the delivery of care.

    Amy: The ability to have my decisions bring actionable patient information to the point of care is my most purposeful achievement in Healthcare IT, it provides a way for the right information to be at the right place at the right time. Working as part of a team of Health IT professionals that are dedicated to the mission of interoperability with the patient as our focus allows for us to further our mission.

    What advice would you give to people who are just starting a career in Health IT?

    Diane: Always continue to learn! Health IT is a rapidly changing environment which requires keeping pace with the latest trends and methodologies to quickly adapt and be effective to achieve better patient outcomes.

    Amy: Teamwork is a must! Know your team, your organization and your community.

    What are the biggest barriers to effective population health management today?

    Diane: Access to patient information and available resources to effectively manage a patient within a population.

    Amy: The ability to have ALL the information in one place.

    What are best practices that can help overcome these barriers?

    Diane: Continue to build a foundation of aggregated and harmonized patient information that supports all aspects of population health.

    Amy: Engage the necessary stakeholders and agree on the underlying principles. Focus on what problems we are trying to solve and find the right collection of tools to make it to the finish line.

    How are organizations tackling population health management today compared with five years ago?

    Diane: In the past population health was much more focused on meeting criteria set forth by regulating bodies which was one of the first waves towards better management of chronic diseases. Today there is a broader focus to move population health from merely a retrospective look at what happened to using analytics to determine what will happen and what we need to do about it.

    Amy: Health IT has gone under a rapid explosion in the last five years. We are more connected than ever before and now have a deluge of data waiting to be turned into actionable insights to improve the health of our patients. Organizations are using new and advanced computing tools to help manage events in a predictive fashion.

    How do you envision population health management changing in the next five years?

    Diane: Patients will increasingly participate in managing their own health and contributing information into their health records, furthering the foundation of information to better identify populations. I believe we will also see a movement towards better managed care across socio-economic groups as the focus of population health continues in the public health arena.

    Amy: I believe we will move away from the term “population health management” and focus on personalized care based on both individual and population-based insights.

     

    Editor’s Note: Health Data Management recently named the 2016 Most Powerful Women in Healthcare IT, including Allscripts Analytics Chief Medical Officer Fatima Paruk. We asked several of these women leaders for their insights to these same questions in a blog series, including Kara Marx Kate Pavlovich and Dr. Carol Steltenkamp.

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    HIT Leader Q&A: The evolution of embedding excellence in health care

    July 19th, 2016

    Editor’s Note: Health Data Management recently named the 2016 Most Powerful Women in Healthcare IT, including Allscripts Analytics Chief Medical Officer Fatima Paruk. This post is one in a series that features insights from some of these women leaders, including Kara Marx Kate Pavlovich and Dr. Carol Steltenkamp.

    Few people in the industry have achieved as much as Carol Steltenkamp, M.D., MBA, FAAP, FHIMSS. She is the chief medical information officer at UK HealthCare, which is the hospitals and clinics of the University of Kentucky (Lexington, Kentucky, U.S.A.), serves as chair for the HIMSS International Board of Directors, and is a professor of pediatrics at the UK College of Medicine.

    Even with all of these responsibilities, she still finds time to see pediatric patients. Her passion for helping others is inspiring, as is the advice she shared in a recent interview. Highlights from that conversation appear below.

    Describe your current role and the path you took to get there.

    When I was a practicing pediatrician, I had done some work on the administration side and realized I had a gap in knowledge around the business aspects of medicine. I went back and worked on my MBA part time in the late 1990s. That was the first time I was really exposed to Health IT and the decision sciences, and it was fascinating.

    Why did you choose Health IT as a career?

    I have a passion for using Health IT to improve health care, which I recognized as an opportunity when I got my MBA. I’ve been blessed to have many opportunities as part of the UK HealthCare system and have been exposed to different aspects as Health IT was evolving. For example, when UK became the regional extension center for most of Kentucky, I was the primary investigator for the branch and could see how it all came together.

    Which of your career achievements are most meaningful to you?

    Having the opportunity to act locally, but to then go throughout the Commonwealth of Kentucky to help implement electronic medical records (EMRs) and take them to the next level through my work at HIMSS. To be able to see this work from an international perspective and effect real change is meaningful.

    What advice would you give to people who are just starting a career in Health IT?

    This really isn’t different than advice for any other industry, but I think it’s important to push yourself, get outside your comfort zone and accept new challenges. In any career, some of it is timing, some of it is luck, and a lot of it is hard work and passion for the opportunities you get.

    What are the biggest barriers to effective population health management today?

    Coordinating the data. Medicine to date has been very episodic. As a primary care physician, I still see patients and experience that. We still need to get data, information and knowledge flowing across the care continuum. From a practicality standpoint, interoperability is still a huge challenge. Using my organization as an example, we are a large academic medical center and see some of the most complex medical cases from across the Commonwealth of Kentucky.

    For example, the endocrinologist at UK trying to coordinate care for diabetic patients needs to share information with primary care docs for the most effective care. Or if we get victims from a car crash on Interstate 75 that runs from Detroit to Florida, we might have their identities but not their medical histories. If we don’t have interoperability with referring providers and hospitals, that’s a challenge. Population health is a hot topic, but you can’t do it optimally unless you have interoperability.

    What are the best practices that can help overcome these barriers?

    One of the major keys will be getting the patients involved. We live in a consumer-driven world for most things, and health care should be looking to do the same. Early on, I used to describe it to folks this way: When you go to the bank and make a deposit in one branch, wouldn’t you be livid if that deposit was not reflected at another branch you visit the next day? As consumers, why don’t we hold Health IT accountable to those same standards? That’s the oddity. Once consumers start requiring information to be available across the continuum, the providers have to be responsive. Health IT has to become the facilitator for care and not a barrier.

    How are organizations tackling population health management today compared with five years ago?

    Five years ago, pop health was something that only researchers did. Now, thinking about population health is really making its way into acute episodic care. The term is not a research term anymore. Providers need to work in concert with patients and payers to be successful. When we are completely aligned in our goals, we will have taken a good first step in the process.

    How do you envision population health management changing over the next five years?

    We’re evolving. It’s like any project that is just starting to move into the action phases. We know the next phases will revolve around quality and be about embedding excellence into clinical practice. For years, as a practicing physician, I could see that Health IT and Quality were two paths that were starting to merge. They are intersecting now and need to work in concert with one another to facilitate – not hinder – better health care.

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    HIT Leader Q&A: ‘Endless possibilities’ spur journey from nurse to CIO and beyond

    July 6th, 2016

    Editor’s Note: Health Data Management recently named the 2016 Most Powerful Women in Healthcare IT, including Allscripts Analytics Chief Medical Officer Fatima Paruk. This post is one in a series that features insights from some of these women leaders, including Kara Marx Kate Pavlovich and Dr. Carol Steltenkamp.

    A fellow honoree from the 2016 Most Powerful Women in Healthcare IT awards reminded me that with recognition comes a responsibility to share knowledge and experience with others. It’s a principle that’s especially true in health care, which is by nature is a collaborative field.

    From Sharp Healthcare (San Diego, California, U.S.A.), Vice President Information Technology Applications Kara Marx recently shared some of her insights with us. Here are highlights from that conversation:

    Describe your current role and the path you took to get there.

    In my current role at Sharp, I manage a team of 200 people who collectively support more than 500 applications that help automate and provide value to our practices. I started out as a nurse, and was introduced to Health IT in 1997 by a physician friend, who was practicing telemedicine. That’s what piqued my interest; I caught the Health IT bug.

    I’ve worked with a vendor for many years, worked with consulting firms and most recently focused my career on IT leadership positions, including a chief information officer (CIO) at a hospital in Los Angeles. I came to Sharp because of organization’s reputation for excellence as a large, multi-hospital system.

    Why did you choose Health IT as a career?

    I see the value that technology brings to the practice of medicine. In 1997, Health IT was expanding fast in clinical areas. I started seeing the potential with telemedicine and how the application of technology could solve so many paper-based challenges. It was quite exciting, to know this was a field with endless possibilities, and I could be part of this evolution. I’ve never looked back. I love my work.

    Which of your career achievements are most meaningful to you?

    I’d have to say working in the capacity as a CIO in an organization that implemented computerized physician order entry (CPOE) for the first time. To go back and think of the days when CPOE didn’t exist, they were different times; it was a really big change. It was an amazing experience to see that significant transformation occur.

    What advice would you give to people who are just starting a career in Health IT?

    What is most valuable to me is to network with and learn from others. Health care by nature is extremely collaborative. Make sure you take advantage of that natural sharing that occurs on the medical side, and let’s work to extend that behavior on the technology side. Health IT is so new – it’s impossible to know everything. The best way to stay current, push your creativity and knowledge is to connect with others and share.

    What are the biggest barriers to effective population health management today?

    For so many years health care has existed to support transactions, incentivized for volume. To move to reimbursement models focused on value is a mental, cultural, technology and workflow shift. There are so many pieces of the care process that need to change. Having everyone on the same page at the same time makes it difficult to jump ahead quickly.

    Also, sometimes it’s challenging to define “population health management.” It can mean focusing on disease management, promoting wellness, meeting expectations for ACO payer contracts – there are a lot of variations on the idea.

    What are best practices that can help overcome these barriers?

    I’ve always been a proponent of good governance, so everyone has the same definitions, goals and objectives. Sharp has done well with population health management, for example with capitated contracts. We’re fulfilling those with tools we already have in place, such as a patient portal, analytics, remote monitoring and telemedicine.

    How do you measure success with population health management?

    It really depends on the initiative. As an organization, Sharp has various qualitative and quantitative operational metrics. There are required quality metrics from payer contracts, satisfaction metrics we hold ourselves to, growth metrics and more.

    Sometimes I think people underestimate what they’re doing. They may be succeeding with population health management, but not giving themselves credit for it. For example, things like managing employee wellness, is a form of population health management. Every healthcare organization is obligated to manage the health of the entire population it serves. In that global sense, our metrics for running the organization are a measure of how successfully we are managing the health of our population.

    How are organizations tackling population health management today compared with five years ago?

    Compared to five years ago, we’ve seen an increase in patient engagement technology and deployments. Meaningful Use has increased the use of patient portals, but it’s beyond that. More is happening with sensor and remote technology, and things like blue tooth scales, blood pressure cuffs in the home. There has also been a lot of growth in analytics and big data over the past five years. We’re doing more to push that to the point of care to help clinicians improve decision making.

    How do you envision population health management changing in the next five years?

    I hope that tools will become more consolidated from a workflow perspective, and we can do a better job putting things together in one spot, providing one picture of the patient, to help clinicians to make an impact.

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    HIT Leader Q&A: Lessons learned from systems and Starbucks

    June 21st, 2016

    Editor’s Note: Health Data Management recently named the 2016 Most Powerful Women in Healthcare IT, including Allscripts Analytics Chief Medical Officer Fatima Paruk. This post is one in a series that features insights from some of these women leaders, including Kara Marx Kate Pavlovich and Dr. Carol Steltenkamp.

    When great minds come together, great things happen. At the Most Powerful Women in Healthcare IT conference, leaders from across the industry addressed some of today’s most pressing issues.

    Kate Pavlovich, director of strategy and data analytics at NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital (New York City, New York, U.S.A.), participated and shared insights in a follow-up interview, including what she learned from working at a hectic espresso bar. Here are highlights from that conversation:

    Describe your current role and the path you took to get there.

    I’m focused on data governance, which sits in the office of strategy, not IT. It’s a new role, intended to provide a link between our institution’s strategic efforts and the reports, tools and processes we need to use and share data. Previously, I was in the quality department as part of the process improvement team. I was focused on patient throughput and length of stay, and I learned a lot about clinical operations. We were also using a lot of data, and I felt like I was constantly uncovering systemic, high-level issues. My interest in that area led me to my current role.

    Why did you choose Health IT as a career?

    I’ve always been interested in health care, in science and how things work. My B.A. is in Biology and I thought about going to veterinary or medical school, but I took a year after college to do community development work in Tanzania. While the one-on-one aspect of medicine is still interesting to me – that experience drew me to how systems impact healthcare delivery. I conducted clinical research and earned a graduate degree in health policy. My career appeals to both my interest in systems, and that nerdy side of me that likes the data.

    Which of your career achievements are most meaningful to you?

    This first example is a little outside the box. When I first moved to New York City, I worked at Starbucks – the early morning shift managing the espresso bar at Grand Central Terminal. That work was all about being able to navigate a chaotic environment and work with my team in a well-choreographed way. I ended up winning an award there, because that’s one of my strengths – finding ways to collaborate and create systems that makes sense. I’m still really proud of that award.

    The second achievement is the work we’re doing now on location mapping. We’re building a centralized resource for all of our locations. I’m working with members of the data architecture team, nursing, facilities and the vendor to come up with a construct to capture a lot of information. It’s rewarding to work with people with different skills and build something complex that no one has ever done before.

    What advice would you give to people who are just starting a career in Health IT?

    Be curious. It might mean following your passions, or saying “yes” to new projects. Try it. You might not be good at it at first, but that’s okay. Another thing, which may be more difficult to find, is an environment where you feel safe and supported. In the long run, you’ll learn and grow so much more. I have this type of work environment now, and it’s amazing.

    What are the biggest barriers to effective population health management today?

    There are so many. One is the financial structure. The government has made it clear it will continue to move toward value-based care financial models. But a lot of commercial contracting is still in the fee-for-service world. When some of your incentives are in one camp, and some are in another, it can be hard to maximize current contracts and be ready for the future.

    Another barrier is that so much of population health is outside of the four walls of the hospital. Health systems and society need to make that cultural shift in thinking about the causes of health and wellness. It’s not just about what’s going in a hospital, it’s about what happens at home, economic factors, societal issues – all of it impacts people’s health.

    How are organizations tackling population health management today compared with five years ago? And how will it change over the next five years?

    There’s a much greater emphasis now on managing populations. Today, my organization has a population health department and participates in efforts, such as an accountable care organization (ACO), bundled payments and more.

    Government payers will keep us accountable for high-quality, good outcomes, which is the right way to go. From a data standpoint, we need to figure out interoperability issues and how to integrate other sources of data into clinical data. The more we can integrate the data – and we will – we’ll do a better job gathering it and using it to influence care.

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    Diabetic patients are hiding in plain sight

    December 16th, 2015

    Diabetes is a complex and costly chronic disease. Studies estimate that diabetes affects 8% of the U.S. population, but confirming this in patients who are undiagnosed, and identifying those at highest risk, remains challenging. At Allscripts Analytics, we’re transforming insights from traditional electronic health record (EHR) data into innovative methods for early identification of chronic disease and population health management.

    Variation in quality of diagnosis documentation within EHRs has necessitated development of new algorithms to more accurately define and manage our populations. After extensive data aggregation and normalization of clinical, claims, laboratory and pharmacotherapy data, our algorithms are validated on more than 40 million records to identify undiagnosed diabetic patients.

    Advancements in visualization tools enable us to deliver insights from this data to our clients in a simple, interactive format in real-time. It helps clinicians better identify undiagnosed and at-risk diabetics, facilitate early intervention, address gaps in care and prevent disease progression.

    Based on early data analysis, we’ve found that providers who only use traditional methods are identifying just 28% of their total diabetic population*.

     Allscripts_Fatima_Paruk_IdentificationOfDiabetics

                    * Initial analysis of 4 million patients (single health system)

    We have built upon the extensive work that Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and other agencies have done measuring the geographical burden of disease from diabetics in the U.S. (check out the interactive map on CDC’s website). And we have the ability to geographically demonstrate the burden of disease from diabetes to our clients and their communities, in real-time.

    Going beyond identification: Trends and predictive medicine

    Once we have defined at-risk patients, we can begin to look at specific complex social and environmental risk factors that impact diabetes  that aren’t necessarily in the health data. For example, counseling a patient on diet modification is unlikely to help if your patient only has access to fast-food delivery because they can’t walk, or resides in a ‘food desert’ where fresh fruits and vegetables are unavailable. With targeted, informed interventions, patients can get treatment tailored to and relevant to their environments, which may include dietary advice, exercise programs or medication availability.

    Understanding how patients have responded to treatment can help predict which patients are at greatest risk for developing retinopathy, stroke, heart disease or other complications from diabetes.

    We are using historical insight from 40 million records in real populations to better understand pathogenesis of disease among different groups of people. If we can show positive patient results from 150,000 other diabetic patients with similar BMI, or race or age, we can empower people with understanding and responsibility for their own health.

    Allscripts Analytics Population Health Analytics (PHA) can be integrated within the Allscripts dbMotion™ Solution to use aggregated and harmonized data from both inpatient and outpatient settings and deliver it back to the point of care for improved outcomes. Primary care providers can identify compliance with bi-annual HbA1c tests ordered by other providers from alternative facilities to eliminate redundant testing, identify true gaps in care, and comply with value-based care funding initiatives.

    If you’d like to learn more about Allscripts Analytics PHA contact us.

    Disease packages currently available through PHA:

    • Diabetes
    • Asthma
    • Coronary Artery Disease
    • Congestive Heart Failure
    • COPD
    • Hypertension

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    Trauma care in Kenya: Healthcare data analytics gives rise to a national EMS policy

    September 24th, 2015

    My introduction to population data and analytics came during my health systems and trauma care fellowship at Johns Hopkins. Having finished my master’s degree in Public Health, I was eager to bring together my interest in improving health systems and background in surgery to improve trauma care in Kenya.

    Unfortunately in Kenya, the burden of injury is poorly defined due to lack of data, and the concept of hospital quality improvement is still emerging. Setting up an injury surveillance system was the perfect opportunity to demonstrate the value of data by identifying and addressing gaps in care of the injured patient.

    As we started to collect clinical data on trauma patients we recognized inconsistencies in providers’ level of data collection expertise, resulting in numerous issues with the collection, entry and extraction of data. To overcome these issues, we transitioned from an existing paper-based data entry system to an app-based data collection tool.  We enabled real-time monitoring of a trauma registry, improved data quality with continuous feedback, and expanded data collection to a more national scale for greater insight. The data identified immediate gaps in care, which served as the foundation for formal quality improvement initiatives.

    Crisis inspires change

    I was still in Kenya when, on September 21, 2013, terrorists attacked Nairobi’s Westgate Mall. In a siege that lasted several days, 67 people were killed and another 175 were injured.  As one of the medical incident commanders at the scene, I led first responders and EMTs in triage and stabilization of victims over the duration of the siege.

    In the aftermath of the tragedy, I struggled to come to terms with the lack of protocol, disparities and gaps in emergency care I had witnessed first-hand. Determined to effect change, I decided to take the account of events to the Ministry of Health, supported by hospital and pre-hospital injury surveillance data.

    This action resulted in an inaugural draft of a National EMS (Emergency Medical Services) Policy, operationalizing the constitutional right to emergency care for 40 million Kenyan citizens by mandating communications to toll-free access to care (911), recognizing trained EMS providers and using protocols in disaster and emergency response.

    By following the data that flowed from this emergency situation, we found that we were able to make a real difference on a national level. And that’s just one example of effecting change with one type of data. With big data, the opportunities to improve health care are limitless.

    What drew me to Allscripts Analytics

    My background in the use of data to improve quality of care has pushed me to search for efficient ways to translate gaps in care to interventions that improve the lives of patients. The shift to electronic health records (EHRs) has made large-scale healthcare data available, and advancements in technology have created information from nearly every aspect of our lives.

    Here at Allscripts Analytics, we have the capability to integrate data from health records and the environments in which we live to create a more holistic picture of health. Through the use of novel tools to navigate through disparate types of data, we have changed the way we gain healthcare insights. We have set out to understand the complex social and environmental factors that impact patients.  We can help identify at-risk populations and predict disease progression and response to treatment, and through the numerous Allscripts Solutions we’re able to bring meaningful insight back to providers the point-of-care to improve individual patient outcomes.

     

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