When a transporter at Camden Clark Medical Center (Parkersburg, West Virginia, U.S.A.) first saw the new Allscripts Patient FlowTM mobile application, he said, “Where have you been all my life?” Reactions like these tell us we’re on the right track in designing solutions that save precious time for hospital staff. Camden Clark agreed to be an early adopter for the new and improved Patient Flow 15.1, and has been previewing the application since January. I recently talked with Camden Clark Clinical Analyst Deanna Boothe, RN, MSN, who shared her experience and what she likes best about the new version. Here are highlights from our conversation: Q. Why did you agree to become an early adopter for the new version of Patient Flow? A. We were due for an upgrade of our Patient Flow software. At Allscripts Client Experience (ACE) in […]

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Don’t reinvent the wheel to get better outcomes

  • Diane Gilbert Bradley, MD
  • 03/19/2015

Many healthcare organizations envision an outcomes-based future for themselves. But many clients find themselves asking: how do we get there? The Allscripts Client Value & Outcomes team wants to help fill in the gaps with best practices through our new Client Outcomes Collaboration Program. We have ready-to-use tool kits that feature successful workflows associated with clinical outcomes from other Allscripts SunriseTM clients and have launched a monthly series of webinars to share them. Simplify workflow changes with 3:3:1 methodology Changing workflows can be a labor-intensive process, but some organizations make it harder than it needs to be. To implement best practices more efficiently, try the 3:3:1 method: 3 (In 3 weeks) – Review the workflow with the pilot users and make any updates as needed 3 (In 3 months) – Review again with end-users for any updates Make no workflow […]

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Taking the detective work out of pediatric care

  • Jennifer MacGregor
  • 03/12/2015

Alberta Children’s Hospital (Calgary, Alberta, Canada) uses Allscripts SunriseTM  to improve care and free its clinicians from tedious “detective work” and calculations. In a recent case study, physicians describe how they’ve applied intelligent order sets to pediatric diabetes management and infant Total Parenteral Nutrition (TPN). Solving the mystery of insulin management According to pediatric endocrinologist Dr. Jonathan Dawrant, managing insulin has three main challenges: 1) Even though diabetes is a growing health concern, not every clinician has enough exposure and expertise to manage insulin. 2) Insulin has no clear dose range; it’s different for every patient. This ambiguity is especially challenging for growing children. 3) To determine the appropriate dose of insulin requires input from various sources. Dawrant observed, “Doing rounds was like doing detective work…you have to gather different pieces of paper, which are located in different places, then […]

The University of Mississippi Medical Center (UMMC – Jackson, Mississippi, U.S.A.) uses Allscripts EPSiTM to identify cost-saving opportunities while helping to improve overall care and patient experience. Using EPSi’s patient analytics and teaming up finance and physician expertise, it has identified two areas with potential cost-saving opportunities of $1.3 million: 1) Reducing unnecessary lab testing Certain laboratory tests have enough diagnostic accuracy to make other tests unnecessary. The UMMC team used evidence-based guidelines to identify and evaluate 21 redundant testing scenarios. “With a rich data set, we can fine-tune pathways and standard order sets for the clinical side,” UMMC Director of Finance Operations Bryan Clements said. “These tools help better prioritize decisions for patient issues, like unnecessary lab testing, which are also often cost issues, too.” 2) Identifying efficient and effective uses for medications UMMC also focused efforts on reviewing […]

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How much will ICD-10 implementation really cost?

Converting to ICD-10 is the largest healthcare mandate in U.S. history, and it comes at a price. Early estimates suggest small physician practices could pay $83,290 for the transition. But, as reported in EHR Intelligence, a recent study in the Journal of AHIMA paints a more hopeful picture. Based on new data about available solutions, authors estimate the cost for a typical small physician practice to be somewhere between $1,960 and $5,900. So, depending on who you talk to, it can cost anywhere from $1,950 to $83,290. Anyone involved with ICD-10 implementations understands it’s the project’s complexity that makes it difficult to estimate cost. Where are the biggest discrepancies? There are a few areas in which these studies differ: 1. Training Researchers who expect lower costs maintain that there are more ICD-10 training options available to clinicians today, including more […]